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Development Channel

Issues and innovations in global economic development

Where Did You Get That Dress?: Bangladesh Two Years on From Rana Plaza

by Shannon K. O'Neil Monday, August 3, 2015
A worker works in a factory of Ananta Garments Ltd in Savar June 10, 2014. Picture taken June 10, 2014. To match Insight Bangladesh-Textiles (Reuters/Andrew Biraj) A worker works in a factory of Ananta Garments Ltd in Savar June 10, 2014. Picture taken June 10, 2014. To match Insight Bangladesh-Textiles (Reuters/Andrew Biraj)

On April 24, 2013, the Rana Plaza factory, which manufactured apparel for Benetton, Primark, and J.C. Penney, among others, collapsed in Dhaka, Bangladesh. The disaster killed over 1,100 and injured another 3,000, most of them young women. In the tragedy’s wake, Bangladesh has tried to help the victims and their families, and to improve industry safety and working conditions more generally, with mixed results. Rana Plaza highlights both the best and the worst of what globalization and global supply chains bring to developing countries.

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This Week in Markets and Democracy: TIP Report Questioned, Turkey Targets Kurds, and Cardin’s Anti-Corruption Agenda

by Shannon K. O'Neil Friday, July 31, 2015
The leader of Turkey's pro-Kurdish opposition Peoples' Democratic Party (HDP) Selahattin Demirtas answers a question during an interview with Reuters in Ankara, Turkey, July 30, 2015. The main aim of Turkey's recent military operations in northern Syria is to prevent Kurdish territorial unity and not to combat Islamic State, the leader of Turkey's pro-Kurdish opposition HDP said on Thursday. Selahattin Demirtas told Reuters in an interview that the ruling AK Party was dragging the country into conflict in revenge for losing its majority in a June 7 general election, when the HDP entered parliament as a party for the first time. To match Interview MIDEAST-CRISIS/TURKEY-KURDS REUTERS/Umit Bektas The leader of Turkey's pro-Kurdish opposition Peoples' Democratic Party (HDP) Selahattin Demirtas answers a question during an interview with Reuters in Ankara, Turkey, July 30, 2015. The main aim of Turkey's recent military operations in northern Syria is to prevent Kurdish territorial unity and not to combat Islamic State, the leader of Turkey's pro-Kurdish opposition HDP said on Thursday. Selahattin Demirtas told Reuters in an interview that the ruling AK Party was dragging the country into conflict in revenge for losing its majority in a June 7 general election, when the HDP entered parliament as a party for the first time. To match Interview Mideast-crises/Turkey-Kurds (Umit Bektas/Reuters).

This is a post in a new series on the Development Channel,“This Week in Markets and Democracy.” Each weekCFR’s Civil Society, Markets, and Democracy Program will highlight noteworthy events and articles.

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This Week in Markets and Democracy: Obama in East Africa, Democratic Backsliding, and Diplomatic Openings

by Shannon K. O'Neil Friday, July 24, 2015
Wycliff Madegwa prepares to display a t-shirt newly printed with the image of U.S. President Barack Obama, ahead of his scheduled state visit, in Kenya's capital Nairobi July 23, 2015. Obama will land in Kenya on Friday with a mission to strengthen U.S. security and economic ties, but his personal connection to his father's birthplace will dominate a trip that Kenyans view as a native son returning home (Noor Khamis/Reuters). Wycliff Madegwa prepares to display a t-shirt newly printed with the image of U.S. President Barack Obama, ahead of his scheduled state visit, in Kenya's capital Nairobi July 23, 2015. Obama will land in Kenya on Friday with a mission to strengthen U.S. security and economic ties, but his personal connection to his father's birthplace will dominate a trip that Kenyans view as a native son returning home (Noor Khamis/Reuters).

This is a post in a new series on the Development Channel,“This Week in Markets and Democracy.” Each weekCFR’s Civil Society, Markets, and Democracy Program will highlight noteworthy events and articles.

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Underground Railroad to Save Yazidi Women from the Islamic State Could Offer Critical Intel

by Catherine Powell Thursday, July 23, 2015
Yazidi refugees stand behind fences as they wait for the arrival of United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees Special Envoy Angelina Jolie at a Syrian and Iraqi refugee camp in the southern Turkish town of Midyat in Mardin province, June 20, 2015 (Umit Bektas/Reuters). Yazidi refugees stand behind fences as they wait for the arrival of United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees Special Envoy Angelina Jolie at a Syrian and Iraqi refugee camp in the southern Turkish town of Midyat in Mardin province, June 20, 2015 (Umit Bektas/Reuters).

It has been nearly a year since the self-proclaimed Islamic State kidnapped an estimated three thousand Yazidi women and children during an attack on their villages in northern Iraq. The Islamic State views these attacks, kidnappings, and killings as justifiable because they consider the Yazidi people—a religious minority group—infidels and devil-worshipers.

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Innovation in Development

by Rachel Vogelstein Tuesday, July 21, 2015
Pregnant women holding their prescription papers wait to be examined at a government-run hospital in the northeastern Indian city of Agartala March 17, 2015. India is betting on cheap mobile phones to cut some of the world's highest rates of maternal and child deaths, as it rolls out a campaign of voice messages delivering health advice to pregnant women and mothers. Amid a scarcity of doctors and public hospitals, India is relying on its mobile telephone network, the second largest in the world with 950 million connections, to reach places where health workers rarely go. REUTERS/Jayanta Dey Pregnant women holding their prescription papers wait to be examined at a government-run hospital in the northeastern Indian city of Agartala March 17, 2015. India is betting on cheap mobile phones to cut some of the world's highest rates of maternal and child deaths, as it rolls out a campaign of voice messages delivering health advice to pregnant women and mothers. Amid a scarcity of doctors and public hospitals, India is relying on its mobile telephone network, the second largest in the world with 950 million connections, to reach places where health workers rarely go. REUTERS/Jayanta Dey

Amidst final negotiations over the Sustainable Development Goals, both private and public sector development funders are turning their attention to the gap between this ambitious agenda and available resources. Last week, government, business, and NGO representatives gathered in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia for the Third Financing for Development Conference to devise ways to support this new development agenda. One proposal is to support innovation to fuel cost-effective approaches to development.

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This Week in Markets and Democracy: Financing for Development, Pope in Latin America, Arrests in Egypt and China

by Shannon K. O'Neil Friday, July 17, 2015
Pope Francis waves while visiting the Banado Norte neighborhood in Asuncion, Paraguay, July 12, 2015. REUTERS/Lucas Nunez Pope Francis waves while visiting the Banado Norte neighborhood in Asuncion, Paraguay, July 12, 2015. REUTERS/Lucas Nunez

This is a post in a new series on the Development Channel,“This Week in Markets and Democracy.” Each week, CFR’s Civil Society, Markets, and Democracy Program will highlight noteworthy events and articles.

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The UN’s Third Financing for Development Conference: After Growth & Aid, What Comes Next?

by Shannon K. O'Neil Thursday, July 16, 2015
U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon addresses the opening of the Third International Conference on Financing for Development in Ethiopia's capital Addis Ababa, July 13, 2015 (Tiksa Neger, Reuters). U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon addresses the opening of the Third International Conference on Financing for Development in Ethiopia's capital Addis Ababa, July 13, 2015 (Tiksa Neger, Reuters).

Governments, civil society groups, and business leaders are gathered this week in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia for the UN’s Third Financing for Development Conference (FFD3). Up for debate is how to fund the Sustainable Development Goals, or SDGs, a new set of global development indicators that the UN will adopt in September.

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Can the Chibok Girls Be Held Accountable for Boko Haram’s Atrocities?

by Catherine Powell Thursday, July 16, 2015
Children rescued from Boko Haram in Sambisa forest react at a clinic at the internally displaced people's camp in Yola, Nigeria, May 2015 (Afolabi Sotunde/Reuters). Children rescued from Boko Haram in Sambisa forest react at a clinic at the internally displaced people's camp in Yola, Nigeria, May 2015 (Afolabi Sotunde/Reuters).

It has been nearly fifteen months since Boko Haram abducted nearly three hundred girls from a secondary school in Chibok, Nigeria, sparking the #BringBackOurGirls campaign on Twitter. Since then, reports have surfaced that the girls have been sold, forcibly converted to Islam, and married to terrorist group members. Dozens of the girls managed to escape, but despite efforts to secure the release of the remaining 219 captives, no agreement has come through.

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This Week in Markets and Democracy: Development Debate, Modi Controls India’s Narrative, and Reigning in Civil Society

by Shannon K. O'Neil Thursday, July 9, 2015
India's Prime Minister Narendra Modi attends an event organised by the Christian community to celebrate the beatification of two Indians by Pope Francis late last year, in New Delhi February 17, 2015. Modi vowed on Tuesday to protect all religious groups, an apparent response to a series of attacks on Christian institutions in New Delhi fueling concerns that minorities are being targeted by Hindu zealots. (Stringer/Reuters) India's Prime Minister Narendra Modi attends an event organised by the Christian community to celebrate the beatification of two Indians by Pope Francis late last year, in New Delhi February 17, 2015. Modi vowed on Tuesday to protect all religious groups, an apparent response to a series of attacks on Christian institutions in New Delhi fueling concerns that minorities are being targeted by Hindu zealots. (Stringer/Reuters)

This is a post in a new series on the Development Channel,“This Week in Markets and Democracy.” Each week, CFR’s Civil Society, Markets, and Democracy Program will highlight noteworthy events and articles.

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This Week in Markets and Democracy: Cost of Tax Evasion, Curbing Corruption, and Labor Rights

by Shannon K. O'Neil Thursday, July 2, 2015
A labourer works at the construction site of a residential complex in Kolkata, December 21, 2013 (Rupak De Chowdhuri/Reuters). A laborer works at the construction site of a residential complex in Kolkata, December 21, 2013 (Rupak De Chowdhuri/Reuters).

This is a post of a new series on the Development Channel,“This Week in Markets and Democracy.” Each Friday, CFR’s Civil Society, Markets, and Democracy Program will highlight the week’s noteworthy events and articles.

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