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CFR Presents

Development Channel

Issues and innovations in global economic development

Empowering Female Entrepreneurs in Rwanda

by Guest Blogger for Terra Lawson-Remer Thursday, April 10, 2014
Artisan entrepreneurs receive business training from Indego Africa at their cooperative, Covanya, in Nyamata, Rwanda, 2011 (Courtesy Benjamin D. Stone, copyright Indego Africa). Artisan entrepreneurs receive business training from Indego Africa at their cooperative, Covanya, in Nyamata, Rwanda, 2011 (Courtesy Benjamin D. Stone, copyright Indego Africa).

Emerging Voices features contributions from scholars and practitioners highlighting new research, thinking, and approaches to development challenges. This article is from Benjamin D. Stone, director of strategy and general counsel at MicroCredit Enterprises, CFR term member, and vice chairman of Indego Africa; and Karen Yelick, CEO of Indego Africa. Here they discuss how Indego Africa’s Leadership Academy for female artisan entrepreneurs in Rwanda aligns with the country’s twenty-year history of empowering women leaders.

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Legal Rights on the Books and in Practice

by Guest Blogger for Terra Lawson-Remer Wednesday, April 9, 2014
Demonstrators handcuff their wrists and tape their eyes and mouths while taking part in a protest calling for changes to the constitution. Yangon, Myanmar, January 2014 (Courtesy Reuters/Stringer). Demonstrators handcuff their wrists and tape their eyes and mouths while taking part in a protest calling for changes to the constitution. Yangon, Myanmar, January 2014 (Courtesy Reuters/Stringer).

Emerging Voices features contributions from scholars and practitioners highlighting new research, thinking, and approaches to development challenges. This article from Juan Carlos Botero, executive director of the World Justice Project, is part of an ongoing Development Channel series on global justice and development.

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The Potential of Clean Cookstoves

by Isobel Coleman Thursday, April 3, 2014
A woman cooks inside her home in San Juan, Honduras, August 2008 (Courtesy Reuters/Edgard Garrido). A woman cooks inside her home in San Juan, Honduras, August 2008 (Courtesy Reuters/Edgard Garrido).

For decades, global health experts have recognized that smoke from indoor cooking is a major contributor to premature death.  Yet, in poor countries around the world, some 3 billion people still rely on wood, coal, or animal dung to cook their food over indoor fires. The impact of the resulting indoor air pollution is devastating, particularly for the women and girls who are largely responsible for cooking and bear the brunt of the smoke. A new study calculates that the toll from indoor air pollution is even larger than previously thought: the World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that exposure to smoke from traditional cooking was linked to 4.3 million deaths in 2012 – more than was attributable to HIV, malaria, and tuberculosis combined, and double the number estimated just five years ago.

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Formalizing Economies to Fight Poverty

by Guest Blogger for Terra Lawson-Remer Tuesday, March 25, 2014
Men look for metals and other valuables in the waste waters of the city dump in Guatemala City, Guatemala, September 2011 (Courtesy Reuters/Jorge Dan Lopez). Men look for metals and other valuables in the waste waters of the city dump in Guatemala City, Guatemala, September 2011 (Courtesy Reuters/Jorge Dan Lopez).

Emerging Voices features contributions from scholars and practitioners highlighting new research, thinking, and approaches to development challenges. This article is from Karen Tramontano, founder and president of the Global Fairness Initiative, and is part of an ongoing Development Channel series on global justice and development.

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Will Justice Be Part of the Post-2015 Development Agenda?

by Terra Lawson-Remer Friday, March 21, 2014
A girl wears a headband with the words, "Love, respect, equality, solidarity, liberty, justice, honesty, and harmony" in Caracas, Venezuela, March 2014 (Courtesy Reuters/Jorge Silva). A girl wears a headband with the words, "love, respect, equality, solidarity, liberty, justice, honesty, and harmony" in Caracas, Venezuela, March 2014 (Courtesy Reuters/Jorge Silva).

Balancing Security and Accountability

by Guest Blogger for Terra Lawson-Remer Tuesday, March 18, 2014
Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir waves at military soldiers in Heglig, Sudan, April 2012 (Courtesy Reuters/Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah). Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir waves at military soldiers in Heglig, Sudan, April 2012 (Courtesy Reuters/Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah).

Emerging Voices features contributions from scholars and practitioners highlighting new research, thinking, and approaches to development challenges. This article is from Nema Milaninia, a legal officer in the Office of the Prosecutor at the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY). The views expressed are those of the author alone and do not necessarily reflect the views of the United Nations or the ICTY. This piece is part of an ongoing Development Channel series on global justice and development.

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Helping the Oppressed, not the Oppressors

by Isobel Coleman Friday, March 14, 2014
A Uighur worker pulls a cart past a statue of the late chairman Mao Zedong at the People's Square in Kashgar, China, September 2003 (Courtesy Reuters). A Uighur worker pulls a cart past a statue of the late chairman Mao Zedong at the People's Square in Kashgar, China, September 2003 (Courtesy Reuters).

As protestors from Kiev to Khartoum to Caracas take to the streets against autocracy, a new book from economist William Easterly reminds us that Western aid is too often on the wrong side of the battle for freedom and democracy.  In The Tyranny of Experts: Economists, Dictators, and the Forgotten Rights of the PoorEasterly slams the development community for supporting autocrats, not democrats, in the name of helping the world’s poorest. Ignoring human rights abuses and giving aid to oppressive regimes, he maintains, harms those in need and in many ways “un-develops” countries.

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Economic Potential for Women, Prosperity for All

by Gayle Tzemach Lemmon Thursday, March 13, 2014
Sumitra Sarkar, 35, cleans a yellow ambassador taxi in Kolkata, India, March 2014 (Courtesy Reuters/Rupak De Chowdhuri). Sumitra Sarkar, 35, cleans a yellow ambassador taxi in Kolkata, India, March 2014 (Courtesy Reuters/Rupak De Chowdhuri).

Last week, the world celebrated the 106thInternational Women’s Day. This year’s theme, “Equality for Women is Progress for All,” called attention to the strides that women have made toward gender equality. Yet despite important gains, women remain less likely than men to be educated, have access to healthcare, or hold political office.

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Navigating Tensions in Social Enterprise

by Guest Blogger for Terra Lawson-Remer Thursday, February 27, 2014
Artisan entrepreneur Therese Iribagiza at Indego Africa's partner cooperative, Cocoki, in Kigali, Rwanda, 2011 (Courtesy Benjamin D. Stone, copyright Indego Africa). Artisan entrepreneur Therese Iribagiza at Indego Africa's partner cooperative, Cocoki, in Kigali, Rwanda, 2011 (Courtesy Benjamin D. Stone, copyright Indego Africa).

Emerging Voices features contributions from scholars and practitioners highlighting new research, thinking, and approaches to development challenges. This article is from Benjamin D. Stonedirector of strategy and general counsel at MicroCredit Enterprises and vice chairman of Indego Africa. Here he discusses Indego Africa’s experiences grappling with the tension between a social enterprise’s social mission and commercial goals. 

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